Thursday, March 2, 2017

Matthew Kelly Is At It Again

Matthew Kelly, who runs an outfit called "Dynamic Catholics", has apparently come up with another gimmick to sucker Catholics into buying his wares.  He has dubbed this one as the "Best Lent Ever".

Long time readers of this blog will recall that I've sounded alarms about previous stunts of his.  He has written books that contain serious errors regarding faith and morality; I've detailed these problems.  FYI, I've sent emails to him regarding these errors, hoping to gets some sort of clarification or even correction of these problems.  I've yet to receive the courtesy of a reply.

I'm seeing signs like the one to the right in parishes in the DC area.  Now think about the arrogance that is all over the language in this poster.  Kelly has the chutzpah to say that his program will give to its users their "best lent ever"?  Moreover, he dares to make jokes about the time-honored tradition of mortification and self-denial, holding them to be inferior to his dubious programs?

The attitude communicated in this poster is at best flippant and smart-alecky: two attitudes unbecoming the Catholic who purports to offer spiritual benefits.  Please don't reward this snarky behavior.  Pass up this dubious offer and stick to the Church's time-honored prescriptions for Lenten penance and reform.  They are the three activities described in yesterday's Ash Wednesday Gospel: prayer, fasting and almsgiving.  Of course be certain to make a good Confession this Lent season.

5 comments:

  1. I can't believe people actually continue to give money to these groups.

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  2. Thank you for pointing this out. My parish, like countless others,is awash in this pernicious nonsense. Matthew Kelly promotes the "Catholic"version of Joel Osteen's big-smile gospel, which is all about becoming your "best self" rather than becoming the saint God created you to be. Now, becoming your "best self" is relatively easy, and potentially enjoyable as well. After all, you yourself (rather than the Almighty) get to say when you are doing your "best." This attitude fits in rather nicely--doesn't it?--with Amoris Chapter 8, and its self-serving contention that flawed human beings can't actually be expected to conform their lives to the Ten Commandments. As long as people are "doing their best" within the complexity of their concrete limits, then that is good enough for Pope Francis. Quote-unquote "dynamic catholicism," in other words, is nothing but heretical Bergoglianism dumbed down and prettily repackaged. What Matthew Kelly is hawking is the spirituality of the Culture of Death.

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  3. I saw the "Don't give up Chocolate for Lent " flyer posted near the entrance to a Church here in the Diocese of Lafayette, Louisiana...but I did not stop to read it. Thank you for the warning.

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  4. Actually, when Matthew Kelly talks about being the best version of yourself, he defines it as being the person God intends you to be, not some version you have decided to be be. One thing he promotes strongly is listening carefully to the Mass on Sunday,to allow God to speak to you through the prayers and readings, about how to reform your life that week so as to grow in holiness. His packaging, as you call it, is not aimed at people like you, who obviously already take the gospel seriously, but at those many many Catholics who are attracted by the
    pull of feel good a la carte catholicism, and who can be introduced to a more robust practice of their faith through his materials. Itwuldbeinteresting to knowwhat errors you have found in his materials.

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    1. The phrase "best lent ever" speaks of the future as well as the past. Therefore it is at best presumptuous and probably dishonest. As for the errors,please click on the link. That will take you back to posts where I did discuss them.

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