Monday, May 15, 2017

What In Hell Is Behind These World Youth Days?

Over the years I have been growing more and more uneasy with the annual World Youth Day events, as over-emphasis on youth has led to increasing laxity in regards to faith and proper decorum, rock-concert ambiance, sacrilegious treatment of the Holy Eucharist, etc..  It appears that things are becoming much, much worse.

The logo for World Youth Day 2019 has been selected and unveiled.  Here it is, to the right.  Aleteia has two big glowing write-ups of the symbolism supposedly in this thing; see here and here.  But honestly - when you first laid eyes on it, what was your first impression?

My first impression is summed up in the image to the left.  Are gullible people being hoodwinked into accepting an image of the serpent (Satan) devouring Jesus Crucified?  I realize that it is quite the fad among some younger Catholics to scrounge money to make the trek to these dubious events, but perhaps parents and teachers may wish to sit up and take notice of what is really going on there, particularly in light of what is transpiring at high levels of the Vatican.  No doubt these youth are sincere in their faith, but they still need guidance and protection from their elders.

7 comments:

  1. Given the strange videos I saw of the acrobats' crucifixion from the most recent World Youth Day, and given the most recent Vatican communications appointee, I must admit my perceptions are geared toward a male homoxexual interpretation.
    My first impression is a snake, with an erect penis ( ambiguous because it could be the left wall of a pregnant belly). The snake is devouring the X, female chromosome.

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  2. Ya know....when you have to completely guess what the "artist" is trying to portray, maybe it's time for a "do-over".....

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  3. So, I had to find out what the meaning behind this logo was. I tried to comment but I don't do facebook nor twitter and it wouldn't allow me to login with google. Here is what I said...
    "Well, thanks for the explanation.  I certainly wouldn't have gotten any of that from the drawing.  I don't see a cross in the red "x"...it is definitely a red "x" though.  Wait, ok, I see the red "t" and "t's" make crosses very well.  I was taught there are more than 5 continents, which are:  Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, South America (and Antarctica).  The "M" for Mary really takes some imagination, whereas the heart, since you pointed it out, is clear.  I will pray for Truth to reach all at World Youth Day.  Thanks, again."

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  4. I lose patience with this WYD mess. Some enterprising soul ought to turn this ridiculous modern art gobbledygookish symbol into a hate symbol meme and spread it far and wide to shame them into changing it; I mean, you know how PC the hierarchy is. Satire and politically incorrect subjects ruffle their feathers.

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  5. It's garbage. Why the touchy-feely, figger-out-what-it-means? How about a crucifix with the Holy Virgin at its foot? Is that not what it is about? This is just more garbage attributable to Pope Pancho and JayPeeToo.

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  6. I hope for an end to World Youth Day, period.

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  7. Attention should be paid to one group at World Youth Days - Juventutem International, which is dedicated to sanctification of young adults through the Traditional Latin Mass, and originally founded by FSSP clergy. Their presence is quite small (several hundred) and thus usually unnoticed by most. But they are there, and their schedule of liturgies and lectures are invariably very edifying.

    In truth, it's more of a witness for tradition - if these things must be held at all, at least tradition should be some part of them. On the whole, though, I think even most Juventutem participants and clergy likely think that a pilgrimage, like Chartres, would be in many ways a better use of the time.

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